5 recipes for a Game of Thrones-style Thanksgiving feast

November 21 | Guest post by Sariann and Chelsea
Roman peaches and honey. All images used with the permission of Inn at the Crossroads.
Roman peaches and honey. All images used with the permission of Inn at the Crossroads.
It's no secret I love the niche cooking blog Inn at the Crossroads. I haven't even read the books from which the ladies take their inspiration, but I am the most basic kind of foodie: one who just loves to eat. I just love reading each weird new recipe IatC puts out.

This Thanksgiving I'm going to try to make at least one of their dishes for a warm and hearthy feeling, but it would be so easy to put together an entire menu from IatC. Here are my picks. -Cat


Main dish: spit-roasted hare

spit roasted hare

This is about as rustic as our recipes get. Limited by our current residency in the city, we roasted our rabbit over our porch grill, rather than a proper fire. The result, as you can see, is a picturesquely charred rabbit suspended over glowing coals. The pairing of the char on the rabbit and honey produces a taste reminiscent of barbecue sauce, smoky and sweet together. Although rabbit is prone to turning dry as it cooks, ours stayed juicy and tender — in part, no doubt, to the honey basting.

Click here for the whole recipe.

Pigeon pie

pigeon-pie

This makes for a rich, hearty meat pie. Pigeon meat is dark like duck, although not nearly so fatty (and if you're wondering where to get a pigeon, click here). The silky texture of the meat is the real show stopper, wonderfully soft and tender, complimenting the light flaky pastry crust. Although we used the suggested spices from a medieval pigeon pie recipe, we made ours much the same as a chicken pot pie, so it oozes with vegetables and a creamy sauce.

Click here for the whole recipe.

A bit of good black bread

black-bread

This recipe is wildly easy, dense, and incredibly authentic tasting, partly because it tastes like beer.

The flavor of the beer really comes through in the finished loaf of bread, a deep, earthy bitterness that is countered by the small amount of honey.

The inside of the loaf is soft, almost crumbly, while the crust bakes hard, ideal for a bread bowl for a bit of Sister's Stew.

Click here for the recipe.

Modern cream of mushroom and escargot soup

medieval-mushroom-escargot-soup

An inherently a rich, decadent dish, the modern soup was divine. The creamy texture of the escargot is countered nicely by the fresh, clean taste of parsley. The wine in the broth adds a depth of flavor, and the longer the broth is cooked down, the creamier and more decadent it becomes. Also makes fantastic leftovers!

Click here for the whole recipe.

Lemon curd

lemon-curd

Lemon curd is so unbelievably good, so decadent, that you will not believe us when we tell you that it's also easy to make yourself. But give this recipe a try, and you'll not resort to buying the overpriced jar at the market ever again.

Click here for the whole recipe.

Modern peaches in honey for dessert

roman-peaches

The modern recipe is pure decadence. Grilling the peaches brings them to their absolute sweetness, and they half cook, making them reminiscent of peach pie filling. The thyme infused honey takes the sweetness and complexity to the next level. You will want to savor every single bite, and including a dollop of creme fraiche or vanilla ice cream will only add to the dish.

Click here for the whole recipe.

I hope this gets you as excited about eating for Thanksgiving as it did me. Good and hearty eating!

  1. Mmmmmm I can't wait to try some of these! I had never heard of Inn at the Crossroads, but I am in love. Foodie + bookworm= match made in heaven :)

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  2. I was just making my grocery list, and just planning on stopping at a bookstore on the way there to pick up the fifth Song of Fire and Ice book! SUCH TIMING!!!

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  3. Kind of really want to make pigeon pie. My in-laws ate it when they were young (they're 1st gen Italian-Americans) and I bet it would be a fun throw back. And escargot-mushroom soup is brilliant. I've always said that escargot is like eating the buttery, garlicky love child of a mushroom and a mussel.

    But as big a fan I am of game-meat of all kinds, I don't think I could eat a bunny. As a former rabbit-owner (R.I.P. Bunnicula!) it would just feel wrong.

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  4. Lemon curd is so easy and tasty!
    I usually make 1 jar every month and boy, does it empty fast :P
    I love it on pancakes but I also slather brioche bread with it.

    As for the rabbit, my mum usually makes it for Chrismas. Delicious.
    She stews rabbit thighs with vinegar, laurel, onions and some other stuff I can't remember.
    The meat gets really tender and it's the only time I actually want to eat boiled potatoes with a meal.

    I think I might just have to try out those peaches…

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  5. I am alllllll about those peaches. Now I know what to bring to my family on Saturday when I have thanksgiving two electric boogaloo

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  6. That peach dessert looks delicious! Writing it down.

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  7. I've made the sweet corn fritters on that blog several times to much applause from my hubs and daughter. Next on my list is black bread (beer and honey, hell yes!).

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  8. I made the honey-orange-glazed duck from the website and it was amazing! Surprisingly easy, too.

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  9. I love Inn at the Crossroads, and I absolutely worship A Feast of Ice and Fire, their cookbook.
    I can say from experience that the black bread is heavenly! It is my go to bread recipe now!
    I also swear by the onions in gravy from A Feast of Ice and Fire, they are heavenly, and the gravy is the most perfect gravy in the universe. I mean, it has apple cider in it, need I say more? Those gravy laden onions will definitely be making an appearance at my Thanksgiving table!
    I love to read the quote from the book that accompanies each recipe aloud to my dinner companions while I cook!

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  10. I'd love to try the peaches but there is no recipe in your link.

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