We're cautiously excited for Netflix's time-traveling Afro-Colombian witch show, Siempre Bruja

Netflix released a trailer for its upcoming drama, Siempre Bruja, which follows the story of Carmen, an Afro-Colombian slave and witch living in the colonial coastal settlement of Cartagena in 1646 who time travels to 2019 to avoid being burned at the stake as a witch. Netflix has had some hits and misses lately with representation, so I'm cautiously optimistic that they'll handle the show featuring a darker skinned Afro-Colombian woman with care.

Hannah Gadsby should totally host an awards show

Have you seen comedian Hannah Gadsby's standup special, Nanette, on Netflix yet? No? Hold that thought and give it a watch. I'll wait. If you have seen it, you'll know it's GOOD. And Gadsby's presenting gig at this week's Emmy's proved her cred yet again.

Here's why this woman deserves to host an awards show…

Tons of Hocus Pocus gear (shirts! prints! costumes!) to put a spell on you

Come little reader, I'll take you away, into a land of enchantment. Hocus Pocus has entered the pantheon of classics to rewatch this time of year. Thankfully, when something becomes popular, MERCH arrives! There are some cute AF Hocus Pocus gear like shirts, jewelry, props, prints, and even costumes that are available to get you in the spirit.

Let me put a spell on you while you peruse the merchandise. I promise not to steal your youth. Probably…

The Pumpkin Spice Latte is back today: love it or hate it?

In its earliest premiere ever, Starbucks is releasing the 2018 Pumpkin Spice Latte today, August 28, unofficially heralding the coming of fall. As someone who's motto is usually, "let people enjoy things," I don't get mad about it. It's a tasty drink and gets people excited for a popular season. How bad could it be? But you know how it is, especially on the internet…

Diversity is SO IN: this video perfectly captures why we can't view diversity as a "trend"

It's so true that diversity and inclusion are big ol' buzzwords in media lately. Recently, between movies like Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians, we're seeing teeny tiny snippets of slightly more inclusive media. I mean, it's always been a thing: add in a token person of color or woman to your news anchor team, superhero squad, voting ballots, or 20-something sitcom friends. But now audiences are asking for more — more inclusion, more marginalized groups represented in politics and communities, and more realistic portrayals of race, gender, sexual orientation, body size, etc.