Philosophy

Not everything on Offbeat Home centers around the physical. Sometimes being an Offbeat Homie is all about the mindset.

A letter to my goddaughter about religion

Agapi mou, I don’t know how much you understood about what your yaya and I were saying tonight. You seemed pretty into the cool new Barbie™ Theia Athena bought you. But even if you didn’t notice now, I imagine that one day you will have questions, so I wanted to address them — while some […]

Privilege & bigotry: how I'm owning it and un-learning false narratives

Privilege & bigotry: how I’m owning it and un-learning false narratives

I am a white male from a small village in North Wales, UK. I married a white American female. I am a step-parent of a young child with whom I get along very well; we are a very close family who always strives to support each other unconditionally in any way possible. I was born within the NHS (National Health Service) and was raised to respect everyone and treat people equally. I have been blessed to have many opportunities in life that others have not had. Here’s how I’m acknowledging my privilege and bigotry and making sure I’m striving to use these privileges to be a voice of reason to those who may not understand or have the same privileges as myself.

What cooking taught me about life

What cooking taught me about life

I didn’t begin cooking from scratch until I hit my 30s. Prior to that it was a lot of arranging food or eating pre-made stuff. Turns out, I really enjoyed it, started a food blog, and now cook super often. It’s fun, but it’s been a little revealing when it comes to living life in general.

Cooking can actually be an analogy for life. That’s no revelation to most people, but it has been for me. Here are some cooking life lessons: what cooking taught me about life and happiness…

False dichotomies: What if the opposite of trying too hard isn’t being lazy?

What’s the thing that you MOST identify with? If you had to pick one quality that most defines who you are and everything you do, what would it be? And then what’s the opposite? And then what if YOU’RE TOTALLY WRONG ABOUT THAT?!

Here’s the favorite thing I learned at my midlife crisis workshop…

Halloween cultural appropriation: My ghost of Halloween past: I used to wear cultures as costumes

My Halloween regret: I used to wear cultures as costumes

Halloween may be a day permitting mitigated inhibitions, but our ethical responsibilities do not get a day off. I speak on this point as someone personally guilty of this specific kind of oversight. At one point in my young adult life, I costumed-up for the holiday as a cultural stereotype, and to this day I look back at what should be cute pictures of fun memories, but instead… I cringe at my offensive choice (and rightly so). I am guilty of perpetuating the social norm that appropriating cultures to which we do not belong and of whose complexities we do not comprehend is somehow acceptable.

I don't want to say #metoo, but here's why I will

I don’t want to say #metoo, but here’s why I will

“I wish we didn’t have to rip our pasts open & show you everything & let you ogle our pain for you to believe us about predation and trauma.” – Lindy West. The sad fact is, though, that the #metoo phenomenon of sharing seems to be the only way to make any headway in chipping away at the bedrock that allows people with any modicum of power to exploit the vulnerabilities of those who have been raised to be silent and self-blaming. Victims are forced to either take on the system themselves or join together to raise a tiny flag to create larger flag aiming for change.