The Holidays are coming: We dare you to send this hilarious "holiday application form" to your family this year!

Each year, The Holiday Conversations in our extended family starts in mid-July, when our little unit begins strategizing with our in-laws, to get out ahead of the game. It's preemptive damage control. Much like leaving a play-date en-masse, we like to present a united front when the parents-in-law begin sniffing around our holiday plans. Our plans for this year's Thanksgiving were already solidified weeks ago, but I'd like to share it here in case anyone finds it useful. I've updated it for the 2015 calendar year…


7 ways smoking weed can make you a better parent

I live in Colorado, where Amendment 64 gave us the right to blaze up for pleasure in addition to medical reasons. That includes *gasp* caregivers of children. Sometimes known as parents. And we're not alone. Marijuana is legal in some form or another in 23 states and the District of Columbia. With weed as popular as it's ever been, it's easy to understand that a vast amount of these users are mothers and fathers. Here are some of the many reasons parents are lighting up…


Learning to be loved by my mother-in-law

My husband and I have been married for a couple of years now and we recently decided to "take the plunge" into the waters of living with his mom, my mother-in-law. When I instantly found myself uncomfortable and lost in this new living space, I was surprised and confused by my feelings. I was embarrassingly confused and mad at myself for acting unintentionally cold to her — unable to find the words to explain to my husband as to why I was feeling this way, because I didn't even understand myself.


What to say to a formerly child-free person who is now pregnant

I am a self-professed child-free lady. A fellow child-free friend recently announced she was unexpectedly pregnant. I can tell she's feeling pretty rattled and struggling with the sudden change in life plans. As a fellow child-freer in a similarly stable life situation, I want to empathize and be there for her and give her a break from all the squee-ing, but I don't want to be a downer. What can I say to her?