boobs

Your big boobs don’t suck, your bra does: How to find the right bra size

I know the anger and depression that large breasts, and especially breasts in ill-fitting bras, can bring. I remember my teenage years with ill-fitting bras, and the shame I felt for myself and my breasts. After I found my right bra size, I was so happy with how my life improved that I decided to get trained as a bra fitter. And I want to help you find your correct bra size too!

Retired boobs: How I learned to relax and love my non-self-supporting breasts

Can I share something a little personal with you? My boobs aren’t “perfect.” They are healthy and reliable. I nursed my two children with them. They have always been there when I needed them. But, I have had an adversarial relationship with bras. Nothing ever fit quite right — even after several professional bra fittings.

Let’s talk about breast reductions

I’m 35, and finally coming to the realization that I just really don’t like my large breasts. So, I’ve started thinking about breast reduction, but find myself conflicted. Something about it feels like cheating, or betraying, the body that otherwise has served me so well. I would love to hear from the Offbeat Homies — both from folks who have had reductions or who have thought about it but took another course.

Let’s talk about small backs and big racks

Over on Offbeat Bride we’re talking about boobs! I’m a 32DD, which means I am a petite chick with a mighty big rack, which means that bra shopping pretty much sucks. I shared some of my undergarment tips for those of us who can’t buy off-the-rack sizes, wanna join the conversation and leave some tips of your own?

What do I do with all my old bras?

I’m going to need a new wardrobe and I’m sure I’ll be dropping off a lot of stuff at charity shops. But… can I do that with bras? Would you buy a second hand booby wrangler? What do you do with bras that are okay, but just don’t fit you anymore?

Pinkwashing: I’m grossed out by the commercialization of breast cancer, but I want to support my recently-diagnosed mother!

I have always been ethically opposed to the commericialization of breast cancer. But now my mother has been diagnosed with breast cancer and I find more and more well-meaning people asking me about pink ribbon campaigns or breast cancer runs/walks etc, or trying to show their support by buying into these campaigns. How do I acknowledge their support without encouraging these activities to which I feel ethically opposed and without sounding like I’m preaching or am just a sour bitch?