Dig piñatas? Learn to make a Uteriñata!

January 25 | Guest post by Amie Rodgers

Want to wow your next baby shower attendees? Make a Uteriñata! It's a piñata shaped like a uterus! It's great for baby showers, but I was also thinking it would be cool for Red Tent parties (daughter's first period) or even hysterectomy parties.

I think beating a uterine effigy with a stick is a little … violent, so I made the Uteriñata to include ribbons at the bottom. Only one of the ribbons is attached to the cervix, all the others pull right out. The lucky ribbon pulls the cervix off and candy and little plastic babies come out!

What you need:

  • Balloon
  • Newspaper
  • White glue
  • Modge-podge (optional)
  • Water
  • Tissue paper or crepe paper (pink and magenta are a great combo)
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Ping pong balls
  • Coffee can lid (or round piece of cardboard)
  • Ribbon
  • Hot glue gun w/ hot glue

How you do it:

Step one:Blow up the balloon quite full, this will give a nice upside-down pear shape to the uterus. Mix glue with water (about 1:1). Rip up the newspaper into strips.

Step two: Dip the newspaper in the glue mixture and remove excess with fingers (this will get really messy!). Lay the strips on the balloon. Cover the entire balloon, with only a small portion around the balloon knot open. Tie a ribbon to the knot and let dry overnight, hanging upside down.

Step three: When the Uteriñata is dry, pop the balloon (the most fun part!). Cut around the cervix, leaving about a 1-2” portion attached as a hinge. This way you have a nice cervix flap. Cover the raw edges of the uterine side with tissue paper using glue or modge-podge. Cut out about a 10” by 10” piece of tissue paper. Pinch the center of the tissue paper and twist. Trim a hole in the twisted peak, then insert the peak into the cervical os. Cover the cervix flap with tissue paper, gluing and trimming as needed.

Step four: Fold up the tissue paper if it doesn’t come pre-folded. Cut 1.5 inch strips of tissue paper. While still folded, cut fringe into the paper every thumb-width or so.

Step five: Glue tissue paper in strips up the Uteriñata. Apply a line of glue or modge-podge on the dry Uteriñata and adhere the top (non-fringed) portion of the tissue paper, leaving the fringed portion free. Start near the cervix (bottom opening) and work up to the fundus (top). Let dry.

Step six: You will need to make three holes in the Uteriñata, one for the hanger, and two for the fallopian tubes. I used a Dremmel drill, but the sharp point of a pair of scissors and some elbow grease should work fine as well. The hanger should be at the top of the Uteriñata. The fallopian tubes should start about ⅓ of the way down the uterus. Make three small holes.

Step seven: Use the lid of a coffee can or a round disc of thick cardboard as support for the top hanger. The Uteriñata will be heavy when loaded with goodies, so you want a nice stable support inside to spread out the weight, rather than center it on one point. Make two holes in the disc, and tie the ribbon to the disc. Thread the long end of the ribbon through the top hole. Fold the disc and insert into the Uteriñata, it will unfold inside and should fit snugly against the inside of the fundus.

Step eight: Wrap pipe cleaners in tissue paper. Use hot glue to secure. At the ends add a long fringe of tissue paper. Glue ping-pong balls into the fringe for ovaries (try to cover as much of any logo as you can). Glue ends of fallopian tubes into holes made at the sides of the uterus. Shape the fallopian tubes as desired. You may glue the ovaries to the fallopian tubes to maintain the shape.

Step nine: Cut several lengths of ribbon (about 20-36” long). You should have at least one ribbon for all participants, depending on how many rounds of ribbon pulling you might want. Thread the ends of these ribbons through the cervical os, it should be a tight fit (if not, add more tissue paper around the cervical os). Tie one of the ribbon ends to an anchor inside the Uteriñata which is larger than the cervical os, such as a plastic baby, action figure, or just a piece of candy. This will be the ribbon that, when pulled, will open the Uteriñata, so make sure it’s a secure knot.

Step ten: Drill a hole in the flap of the cervix across from the hinge. Drill a corresponding hole on the uterine side. Fill the Uteriñata with goodies. Thread a short piece of ribbon through both holes to secure with a simple knot.

Hang from something sturdy! Take turns pulling out ribbons until the anchor ribbon is pulled. The cervix should give way and candy will pour out. If the cervix gets hung up or the candy flow is too slow, be ready for an emergency episiotomy with a pair of scissors!

All photos by Kat Mitchel.

  1. This is great! And I had never even heard of Red Tent parties. What a lovely idea!

    1 agrees
  2. I am meeting friends after work TODAY to plan a baby shower for another friend – and we are SO including a uteriñata! Thank you, thank you! This couldn't be more timely or awesome.

    • Hey Addie,

      Just FYI, I do sell the Uterinatas from my Etsy store if you're interested in buying one rather than making!

      Have a blast!!!

      –Amie

  3. Oh my god, I just saw these on Regretsy today too! Too too funny, I love them way more as a baby shower thing than a red tent thing:D

    • Well, if there has to be a red tent thing, then a "SMASH IT WITH A BIG STICK" version sounds much more appropriate to me! (There doesn't even have to be anything in it.)

      (I don't want to be all negative on getting periods, but mostly I think most women don't experience their periods (beyond what they stand for maybe) as something enjoyable, and if there's a party there should be room to express the frustration too!)

      5 agree
  4. Holy smokes, next baby shower it'll be on like Donkey Kong. Thank you for sharing!! 😀

  5. I could be anal about the tubes turning the wrong way, but eh, who cares (besides medical me) but I do want to say that once a month I would really like beating this thing with a stick (a big and heavy one) much better than the string version.
    I would also have killed everybody ever if there had been anything like a red tent party for me (I cried into my mom for half an hour and permitted her to tell my father only if he never ever mentioned it to me), but I hear that some people cope better.

    tl;dr: This is aweome!
    (too long, didn't read)

    1 agrees
  6. Don't tell my onbeat sister-in-law, I'll be showing up at her baby shower next month with one of these. :O Thanks for the tutorial!

    3 agree
    • Oh me too! My sister-in-law will probably never speak to me again, but it will be worth it and funny 🙂

      I also love the Red Tent Party idea. Although my daughter probably has another good 11 or so years before that 😛

      1 agrees
  7. I just about died laughing while reading this aloud to my brother in a coffee shop. People are looking at me like I'm crazy. Oh well!

  8. Forwarding to my doula group!

    Is it weird that I would do this for a plain old birthday party? I'd pair it with a cake made to look like a placenta!

  9. I am a childbirth educator and doula. I will use this idea over and over and over again. Loooovve it!

  10. Love this! I've been talking about wanting a uterus piñata to celebrate the last weekend of having my uterus! Thanks!!!

  11. I'm glad I found this post! We had a great time with our uteriñata, and my husband thought up a very ingenious cervix method. If we make another, I'll document the new "cervix" and post it here!

  12. Made one of these for my friend's dark baby shower (rather than pulling strings she took out some "done with being pregnant" stress and beat it with a lightsaber until it burst). In addition to chocolate, I also put a baby doll inside. We all realized later it would have been a SUPER funny gender reveal.

    Also, I put some shredded colored paper in there that we were all referring to as "afterbirth". Weeks later the hostess would text us that she found more afterbirth behind the couch, under the cushions, etc. 🙂

Join the conversation

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

No-drama comment policy

Part of what makes the Offbeat Empire different is our commitment to civil, constructive commenting. Make sure you're familiar with our no-drama comment policy.