Shame kept me from sending single parent Christmas cards

Why over a decade of holiday seasons have come and gone without a Christmas card from us is complicated.

Actually it's not! It's because of shame; plain and simple.

I ended up feeling like I didn't have a "right," or we weren't "enough of a family" to send one out. Like it was a feeling that we weren't complete. Like somehow we were less of a family because there wasn't a second parent, or even another child. Just me and her. Just. Only.

Tree Day, or our Christmas Before Christmas tradition

The end result of our Tree Day is the best of both worlds:

We get to have Christmas our way, with the just two of us, and when the real Christmas rolls around a couple of weeks later, we get to spend quality time with our families. It also serves to make the erection of the Christmas tree decorating its own special ritual, when it could be seen as just a chore.

How can I have a great big long-distance holiday?

We're a young military family that anticipates a move soon, so we won't be going home to visit family this Christmas. This isn't the first time (nor will it be the last), but this year is different… It's going to be our daughter's first Christmas, and we very much want to include our parents. I need some advice about how to have a great big long-distance holiday! Any suggestions would be much appreciated, especially from anyone who's done this before.

2.6k

How do deal with gift-giving as your families and finances change?

Now that our brothers are over 21, do we still get them presents? And how do we tell them we don't want them to use their limited funds to get us anything? And can we not get them presents while still buying my younger siblings presents? And what about when our siblings have kids too? We can't afford to buy 10 kids quality presents as well as all of our other people! Plus, I don't want our kid coming home with a truckload of gifts. How have other Homies dealt with family gift giving as their families and finances have changed?