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I have Katniss scratch fever: How do I learn to shoot stuff?

Homies, I'd like to learn to shoot stuff. Targets, mostly. Maybe with guns, maybe with arrows — honestly, I'm flexible, and I don't have any solid goals for these skills — it just looks like fun and seems like a good thing to know how to do (in case, you know, zombies). But I have no idea where to start.

51

The 8 awesome advantages of having a tandem bike

My husband is the kind of person who, when faced with an escalator and a set of steps that both stretch as far as the eye can see, will ALWAYS choose to run up the stairs. I have been known to get out of breath walking up the few flights of steps to our flat. I wanted to get more active with him, but when it came to ways of spending time together that satisfied my husband's love of endorphins, we were a little bit stymied. A few years ago we found the solution — a tandem bike that we've name Daisy.

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The 12 bad-ass stand-up coolers that'll make your outdoor parties "chill"

I was at a small house party recently where the owners of said small house had the coolest freaking party accessory ever — a counter-top-height cooler on wheels. It was compact, it was brightly colored, it had a bottle opener built in, and it was full of booze… it was beautiful and I want one. So now I'm on the hunt for a best outdoor party accessory ever. Grab a cold on and join me?

51

What the float!? Pool sharks and other amazing rafts

Last year 'round summer time, I introduced you to my favorite pool float of all time — the inexplicable pretzel float. This year we have a new winner — the pool shark! Just gaze upon it, in all it's sea-through, metallic-bespotted, adorableness. You know how much I love all things shark, so clearly I couldn't resist sharing it with mah Homies. But that's not where the amazing floaty things end. Here are some more rafts that'll make you say WTF (what the float)?

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Distance? Need? Ability? What makes a person a runner?

I started running reluctantly. I'm a doctor, and everyday I tell people to exercise. After giving people this advice for a month or two, and completely neglecting to engage in any physical activity myself, I started to feel guilty and hypocritical. I made the decision to start running. Both before and after I starting running, people would ask me if I'm a runner. I would smile uncertainly and ponder how to respond. Were they asking because of my body type? Was there something they recognized in my energy that identified me as a runner? Did my two mile runs make me a runner? To me, this barely counted for anything, although I knew that I felt better about myself and my life when I ran.